CD REVIEWS: SPECIAL FEATURE

LIMITED SPACE AND TIME MEAN THAT NOT EVERY RELEASE WE COMMISSION FOR REVIEW MAKES IT INTO PRINT… THAT’S WHAT THE SITE’S USEFUL FOR THOUGH, RIGHT? SO TAKE A DEEP BREATH AND BRACE YOURSELF FOR THIS INSTALLMENT OF REVIEWS… THE NEXT ROUND IS DUE TO BE PUBLISHED ONLINE SOON.

 


VERDICTS
6 Masterpiece
5 Exceptional
4 Commendable
3 Solid
2 Second rate
1 Firing blanks
0 Sitting duck


 

BIOHAZARD
REBORN IN DEFIANCE
NUCLEAR BLAST
I suppose the hardcore heads will herald this as the best thing since sliced bread: the return of the classic ‘Hazard lineup, and a new album to boot. Of course, the amount of innovative developments since the first commercially sliced loaf back in 1928 makes that a pretty redundant phrase these days. How does that apply to Reborn In Defiance? Well, the album is pretty standard Biohazard fare, with an abundance of bounce-along riffs filled out with the obligatory in-unison shouting parts that make the Brooklyn hardmen sound like they do today…which is pretty much what they sounded like 20 years ago. The bottom line is that if you’ve ever heard the guys before – and let’s face it, who hasn’t? – you’ll have a good idea how this album sounds. Maybe it’s slightly heavier than their earlier material, but there’s not a snifter of a ‘Punishment’-style crowd-pleaser to be had on here. It’s a decent album, but not one that makes much of a dent in today’s scene other than to live off the back of a name and a ‘re-formation’ marketing line.
JOHN NORBY 2.5

 

CARETAKER / UNDERSMILE
SPLIT RELEASE
BLINDSIGHT RECORDS
Winchester’s Caretaker contribute only 11 minutes to this largely intoxicating split that can be picked up for as little as four quid from Blindsight – a bargain in this epoch of inflation. Vocalist and guitarist Harry Goodchild obviously harbours an admiration for the likes of Steven (Porcupine Tree) Wilson – to this much, his singing bears witness – and Caretaker manage to embed their down-tempo, progressive, sludgy post-rock firmly in the memory, leaving the listener eager to hear more. The split’s true winners are Undersmile, whose gloomy post-doom injects some much-needed originality into a stuffy Oxford music scene. Taz and Hel’s joint female vocals are part marijuana drawl and part Sabbath Assembly, and are a sprawling highlight throughout. Undersmile’s influences are clearly disparate, and a journey through sonic terrain occupied by the likes of Fudge Tunnel, Boris, Melvins, Michael Gira’s various incarnations, and even Nick Cave is necessary in order to trace the origins to their sound. If the 24 minutes on offer here are a declaration of intent, then Undersmile are a band to watch out for; and as for this split, it frames two contrasting bands with plenty of talent in a delightful little package.
GEOFF BIRCHENALL 4.5

 


CLOAK OF ALTERING
THE NIGHT COMES ILLUMINATED WITH DEATH
HUMAN JIGSAW RECORDS
That boy Mories: he’s quickly becoming the new Shatraug, always juggling a thousand projects at once. Mind you, a couple of them – namely Gnaw Their Tongues and De Magia Veterum – already have discographies vast / absurd enough to challenge Drowning the Light or Striborg, but recently the Dutch noisenik has been spreading his creative wings under a greater variety of monikers…even if those same wings flap a fairly similar way. If his most renown ‘wing’ (GNT) has been exhibiting a Blut Aus Nord jones as of late and, in kind, his other main ‘wings’ (DMV and Beast of the Apocalypse) have grown inextricably closer in their vision of black metal, here in Cloak of Altering he lets fly that BAN influence. The crux of this assertion? How those wobbly dubstepping beats stutter for a bit and then it’s jet-fucking-propulsion into outer space and thus spooge forth those dissonant-yet-twinkling (dissonantly twinkling?) melodies that are as much Vindsval as they are Mories; it’s a wild ride, but it’s wildly familiar. Still, if Shatraug can do it…who am I to argue?
NATHAN T. BIRK 4


DRAUGEN
AMONG THE LONELY SHADES
ANCESTRALE PRODUCTIONS
France’s Draugen were formed in 2000, but have only just released their debut album, with no other releases preceding it. Eleven years in the making, this better kick some ass – or at least persuade a few fat goth kids to slit their wrists. Anyhow, the most obvious influence is Sweden’s Shining, there’s no way past it… call it lazy journalism, but it’s just damn obvious. That aside, this is undoubtedly a damn frostbitten black metal record with lots of credit going to second-wave Norwegian output, also. It’s minimalist music seemingly aspiring to be progressive. So, is there potential? Well, yeah: there’s always potential – unless you play brutal tech death with pig vox – and it cannot be denied that this album has its moments, and I cannot deny that I didn’t experience its sheer power from time to time. What it really lacks, however, is the consistency. My guess is that it’s been overworked to a degree. A decade is a long time for songwriting, and it just seems they’ve gotten lost in their own project to an extent, losing judgement and control of the beast they created.
MIIKA VIRTANEN 2

 


DYING
BIZARRE AND BLOODY TALES
AUSTRALIS RECORDS
For all the apparent technicality on this debut by the Chilean five-piece, Bizarre And Bloody Tales is a simple-enough affair that offers a collection of tracks with little in the way of variety throughout. It’s often like a simplified mix of Aborted meets The Haunted, but never manages to achieve the expertise of either. The vocals are sometimes like Dani Filth with guttural bellows to counteract the whining, but there’s an attempt at range by frontman Leopoldo Silva that works on occasion, but not always. Oftentimes, this is too chaotic for its own good, not so much down to the musicianship or ideas as it is to its production values, which do leave a lot to be desired when things get a bit on the hectic side. Dying have tried to cram a lot into their first album – everything from brutal death metal to melodic heavy metal features – and while it doesn’t always work, there’s clear potential for the future. The first thing they should do on their next release is sort out that awful snare sound, though.
JOHN NORBY 2.5

 


FORTERESSE
CREPESCULE D’OCTOBRE
SEPULCHRAL PRODUCTIONS
Talk about November coming fire: Crepescule d’Octobre finds a Forteresse with a fire lit under their asses! As much as I loved the woozy, Disintegrating spread of preceding LP Par Hauts Bois Et Vastes Plaines, I can really get onboard and get gone with this. The production’s raw yet full, cold yet warm, really laying the foundation for these songs to take flight. And take flight they do, most of ‘em anchored by the Fenriz blast (y’know: that trademarked galloping blastbeat) but deftly shifting speeds and thus dynamic contours as the raging riffing swells and swells, the mysticism cresting as a clean(er) guitar figure is overlaid and a majestic melody is driven into your cranium, soul, psyche, wherever… whew. Like I said, it’s a rush. Ironically enough, aside from the two-minute intro, two of the songs here are seven minutes long and the other three top nine, so it’s a very good thing those riffs / melodies are as involved / involving as they are; they’re perfect for just laying back and letting go or, conversely, getting up and going away. …Someone give me a smoke…
NATHAN T. BIRK 5

 


HERRATIK
COMPROMISE GONE
BATTLEGOD PRODUCTIONS
Herratik sit somewhere between melodic and violent thrash, and they straddle that divide with a definite confidence. They put me in mind of early UK thrashers Gomorrah, crossed with a rough-and-ready Kreator. They are not afraid to let the riffs get dirty, and this fuses perfectly with the less-than-clean production that modern thrash metal seems to have adopted. This is rugged old-school thrash metal the way it was meant to be: no airs and graces, and something that just screams out to be played at maximum volume. With the ten tracks on Compromise Gone weighing in at a whisker over 30 minutes, these guys don’t hang around, and Herratik ensure that the album never gets close to outstaying its welcome – something that can’t be said of many modern thrash albums that just seem to run out of ideas and feel like they are dragging themselves kicking and screaming towards the finishing line. Sure, Herratik won’t change the world with what they play, but there will always be space for a damn good thrash album in many a collection.
SAM CROWLEY 3.5

 

KROH
S/T
DEVIZES RECORDS
I never thought I’d hear myself say this, but this is too heavy! The guitars and bass are just way too weighty for the vocals, even to the point where the production finds it hard to stay in control without everything falling out when things get a bit hectic. It’s a shame, too, because Francis Anthony’s vocals are absolutely fucking amazing! This is pretty close to the UK’s answer to Ghost in a more stoner / sludge framework, and it has so much potential, but the only way of saving Kroh, really, is to reign in the instruments a little to give Anthony the prominence he really deserves within the scope of the recording. It’s not that he’s too low in the mix; it’s just that everything else is far too heavy. With Paul Kenney (Mistress, Fukpig) at the helm and handling pretty much everything but the vocals, one wonders if it was down to an error in judgement or a simple case of a musician / writer remaining too close to the material and not letting a producer take the reigns unhindered.
JOHN NORBY 2


LAST VIEW
HELL IN REVERSE
VICISOLUM PRODUCTIONS
I don’t listen to a lot of metalcore. In fact, I listen to as little of it as this job will allow. However, even I have heard pretty much everything that Last View have to offer so many, many times before. This really is woefully unoriginal stuff, with each and every song following an incredibly predictable pattern. It’s the same old riffs, the same old breakdowns, and the same old awful, tedious vocals. It’s like listening to the same bloody song ten times over – and I don’t like the song! There are positive things about Hell In Reverse: the sound is pretty immense; it’s very competently played, with the drummer in particular turning in a praiseworthy shift; and the booklet looks nice. Hell, it’s probably great fun for young folk to leap around to with their backpacks on…but I’m old and I don’t have a backpack. In the sleeve notes, Grave, Dismember, Entombed and Slayer are thanked for their inspiration, but that inspiration clearly wasn’t musical. So, metalcore done well but without an original idea – sound good to you?
CHRIS KEE 2

 


L’ESPRIT DU CLAN
CH V: DRAMA
XIII IS RECORDS
Formed in 1995, L’Esprit du Clan have been around for quite a while, having released five albums in the process. True to their native roots, they still sing in French, delivering their individual blend of hard/metalcore with balls. Now, now, don’t let the m-word scare you off: this isn’t just your usual two-chord chuggattack – there’s definitely more going on here. This lot are clearly into their metal, too, heavily influenced by At The Gates (or by bands that ripped them off), and by drawing influences from a variety of genres, they manage to create quite the interesting concept. Highlights include the catchy ‘Fils du Personne’, which even springs to mind Angelcorpse’s ‘Sons Of Vengeance’. The album is generally quite accessible, but what lets it down is the production, which is way too clean for this sort of music. It also suffers from a lack of variation, as everything becomes quite repetitive towards the end, with chugging taking over from the inspired riffing at the beginning of the album – it’s the B-side phenomenon again. One to watch, though.
MIIKA VIRTANEN  2.5

 


LIVSTID
S/T
FYSISK FORMAT
Livstid means ‘lifetime’ in Danish, but turns out this lot is actually Norwegian, hailing from Varg-town (Bergen) out of all places. Despite their locality, however, they have preciously little in common with the Burzums of the world, instead going down that hardcore path. Self-dubbed as a ‘Crusty D-Beat Punk Attack’ and influenced by such masters of the craft as Axegrinder, Disrupt, and Amebix, you’d think that only awesomeness can be on offer. And indeed, the riffing here is rather wicked and the songwriting shows aspiration for greater things. Unfortunately, a number of factors really let this album down. The big three here are: vocals, production, and Shai Hulud. Unlike the brilliant Kriminell EP, the production is crystal clear and extremely unfitting for hardcore-punk, more like neo-thrash / Lamb of God-style. The leads, melancholic and moody as they may be, end up sounding pretty damn emo at times. The biggest problem, however, are the vocals. I can only recommend for this Livstid lot to trash that screamo crap at the mall where it belongs… and leave those terrible gang-vocal breakdowns to NYHC.
MIIKA VIRTANEN 2.5

 


LIKE MOTHS TO FLAMES
WHEN WE DON’T EXIST
NUCLEAR BLAST
Ohio quintet Like Moths To Flames don’t seem to know what they want to be: they seem unsure if they’re happier playing the Bring Me The Horizon card or the sickly sweet Blood Brothers card; we’ll just call it metalcore for the sake of argument. And for the most part, it’s not terrible. It’s got some good moments, but the problem is, it doesn’t marry up very well. Tracks like ‘You Won’t Be Missed’ boasts moments of sheer nastiness and a big, gooey chorus. Of course, they’re not the first to do this (more like the 1,234, 827th), but they’re the first to make it feel like you’re listening to two records at once. As a metalcore band, they aren’t bad; in fact, they’re good at what they do, but they need to lose the goo and use the clean elements in a more daring way. Simply sticking in a pop chorus with a vocalist who could easily double in a band like You Me At Six just doesn’t work.
TOM BRUMPTON 2.5

 


OPERA IX
STRIX – MALEDICTAE IN AETERNUM
AGONIA RECORDS
When Cadaveria departed Opera IX after The Black Opera, their decision not to find a similar singer seemed foolish at first, but it finally seems to be paying off. Whereas Maleventum suffered from a charisma-vacuum in the vocal department and Anphisbena still felt like Opera IX minus a proper frontperson, Strix is, for better or worse, a full-blooded, lush symphonic BM album. M’s vocals have more authority than before, and he is backed by music which is dramatic, even romantic, but with plenty of muscle and more compact and direct than some of their more epic song-structures of old. What’s nice is that it isn’t a case of either metal or symphonic; a song like ‘Mandragora’ has a ceremonial quality created by the blasting drums and intense riffing, but enhanced by the grand sweep of the keyboards – to remove any part would diminish the whole. This is true of much of Strix, but while mature and well-crafted, the fact remains that it’s symphonic black metal and therefore an acquired taste.
WILL PINFOLD 3.5

 


OUTRAGE
GO TO HELL
METAL ON METAL RECORDS
German thrashers Outrage were originally spawned way back in 1983 and put out a series of demos before disbanding in 1988. They then re-formed in 2004 and, since then, have been releasing albums with a feverish frequency. Go To Hell is the sixth full-length to emerge in little more than as many years, and it’s jam-packed with old-school metal that harks back to the likes of Venom, Destruction, and particularly Hellhammer and Sodom. ‘Into The Abyss Of Belial’ is a dead-ringer for Tom G. Warrior’s earliest musical endeavours, and ‘Refugee To Beyond’ sounds like it was conceived after a heavy night of Outbreak Of Evil worship. As those comparisons probably communicate, Outrage deal in pretty simple fare, with little in the way of technical complexity. However, the songs all have character and the thick, earthy guitar sound is pleasing enough to cover any number of shortcomings. Outrage may not change your metal world, but if it’s a healthy dose of real, unpretentious metal and dark tales of witches and demons that you’re after, then they fit the bill nicely.
CHRIS KEE 3.5


ORDO OBSIDIUM
ORBIS TERTIUS
EISENWALD
Ordo Obsidium is the latest Bay Area black metal act to break through from the USBM underground with their anticipated debut full-length, Orbis Tertius: a release which doesn’t offer much in the originality department despite arriving armed with an interesting approach and a handful of driving riffs. The duo (and un-credited bassist) attack with spell over the course of five lengthy tracks, drawing from a wellspring of influence which is equal parts mournful doom and pitch-black hatred. Again, the idea to combine funeral doom and black metal isn’t exactly new, with most ‘suicidal black metal’ acts achieving superior results than this California crew, and Ordo Obsidium’s tune does get particularly stale before the first track has even completed spinning its web. Of course, this doesn’t bode well for the remainder of Orbis Tertius, which, as expected, rides a whole lot of middle ground without ever rising or sinking to either location. No, the band instead crafts an album of solid-yet-uninspired songs which might be enough to please the easily amused, but which certainly aren’t enough to lift Ordo Obsidium to the ranks of legend by a long shot.
METALGEORGE 2


RECRUCIDE
BLOODIVINE
AUSTRALIS RECORDS
Chile’s Recrucide have apparently been around since 1993, but Bloodivine is only their second full-length album, following on from their 2005 debut, Rebellion. Bloodivine is comprised of 12 crisply delivered and powerfully produced death / thrash metal batterings and one pause for reflection, in the form of the soothing ‘Candelabrum’. Each and every track possesses moments of real class, particularly in the instrumental and solo sections (guitarist Marko Zepeda, take a bow), and the album as a whole is cohesive and convincing. Despite all those positives, Bloodivine is not an album that captures the heart with a single listen; these dark, steel-clad monsters take a little more work than that to fully appreciate. It’s worth the effort and repeated plays, though, because while Recrucide haven’t quite grasped true brilliance yet, what you’ll find is an album that skirts around the boundaries of the exceptional before settling comfortably into the ‘very good’ category. Concluding track ‘Scars’ is a definite highpoint, and it leaves me hoping that it doesn’t take another six years for the band to produce their next album.
CHRIS KEE 3.5

 

SEGES FINDERE
PROCLAMATION OF BLOOD VENGEANCE + MASSACRE SUPREMACISTA
OLD CEMETERY RECORDS / DEATHCAMP DISTRIBUTION
The lads in Seges Findere saw my recent review of their Terrorist Warfare collection and thought I could do better, so here we are with their most recent full-length, Proclamation Of Blood Vengeance, and a reissue of their first, Massacre Supremacista. Actually, I had reviewed that debut LP upon its initial release, and a couple years later, I’m finding it much better than I remember it: moving between hammering goatgrind and miasmic D-beat, kinda like if Ugra-Karma-era Impaled Nazarene sprung forth from the womb of Brazil (yes, Seges Findere are Brazilian), the production thick and luxurious – at least for something so gnarly – and drawing forth every red-eyed / blackout nuance (again, relatively speaking). Strange, then, that Proclamation is more ‘normalised’ despite being much more monomaniacally one-dimensional. It’s as if the duo decided to get with the game but really didn’t now what the game was – canned old-school Brazilian blackness? speedy ‘n’ sterile black/death? primitive elevation that’s not even reaching? – the production really doing them no favours, just flat and mechanistic in the pejorative sense(s). Or put another way, it all sounds ‘aggressive’, but it doesn’t have the fire of its predecessor. A couple keepers in the bunch, though, and a cool (albeit short) noise track. Again, I still stand by the opinion that those first five (BONKERS) songs on Terrorist Warfare are the band’s best – Seges Findere, I’ll be keeping my beady eyes on you.
NATHAN T. BIRK 2 + 3.5 RESPECTIVELY

 

SKELETAL DAMAGE
FIRE AND FORGET
RISING RECORDS
The explosion of new UK thrash a few years ago was great fun while it lasted, with a new band to discover every week. The cream of the crop, namely Evile, have risen relentlessly, outpacing all the competition, and a handful of other class acts like Mutant and Deceptor are still in there fighting. The wave of enthusiasm, interest, and support, though, is largely over – and Skeletal Damage’s debut album has just arrived. I hope that a late arrival at the party doesn’t damn this young band to obscurity, because Fire And Forget certainly has plenty going for it, not least a lot more diversity in their sound than most thrash outfits. As well as that, the band members all clearly have plenty of ability, and they have crafted a well-produced, interesting album that they can be proud of. As with most debut albums, it is, of course, a long way from perfection, but this is still a very decent opening salvo from a band that deserve to be heard and given the chance to develop further.
CHRIS KEE 3.5

 


SORGELDOM
…FROM OUTER INTELLIGENCES + VITHATTEN
FROSTCALD RECORDS
So, last year’s Inner Receivings turned the heads of this writer and many others, and now we’re presented with two newly released Sorgeldom full-lengths. Of the pair here, …From Outer Intelligences is far closer in sound (not to mention visually: the colour and non-BMness of the album cover vs. the monochromatic cultness of Vithatten’s is strikingly parallel to the band’s preceding pair of LPs – sonically speaking, too, but there’s some truth here… ANYWAY) to the widescreen splendour of Receivings. Melodies hang dreamily and then dissipate or alternately bubble up from the frantic, near-chaotic clatter to soften the surge of the wreckage, only to whisper of memories to come (or long gone), the spiral tight but not tense; or put another way, it’s a far more ‘balanced’ version of its predecessor, an assessment which might go either way, depending your vantage point. Vithatten, going back to that “truth” I just mentioned, goes the unapologetically purist route, both in songwriting and production: the former forest-bound but stressed-out and yet more than a bit mystical, the latter very ‘live’ and ‘in the garage’ but also lively and sacrificing not one whit of clarity. It’s interesting to note that …Intelligences was written / recorded over the course of a year and a half while Vithatten was accomplished in merely a day…can’t argue with such diabolical creativity, innit. Put together, then, nowhere near as immediately awe-inspiring as said 2010 tome, but jointly there exist plenty of riches to be plundered.
NATHAN T. BIRK 4 FOR BOTH

 

SPANCER
GREATER THAN THE SUN
THE CHURCH WITHIN RECORDS
Strangely-named snail’s-pace-skulking DOOM: Saint Vitus meets Khanate, with a very angry man on vocals and a massive dark space between all the instruments…awesome. That space is important; although there is a certain amount of sludginess, each instrument has room to breathe, and the whole never sounds like a mess; in fact, the songs would lose a vital part of their appeal if every little whisper of the cymbals didn’t come across so clearly. For music that is at times incredibly monolithic and simple, there is subtlety here, too – indeed, the hoarse vocals, the lumbering-yet-nimble dynamics, and the Iommi-turned-up-to-eleven guitar-playing are always in the service of the epic songs. Take the first track, ‘The Great Saint Equalling Heaven’, for instance: what begins as the simplest of bludgeoning riffs builds almost imperceptibly into an extremely affecting mid-paced, dynamic behemoth of Sabbath riffs and despairing shouting. There are only four songs, but each ebbs and flows in a masterful display of organic songwriting and elemental musicianship. Superb.
WILL PINFOLD 4.5

 

TEMPLE OF BAAL / RITUALIZATION
THE VISION OF FADING MANKIND
AGONIA RECORDS
Split releases can be pretty hit-or-miss, and anything more than a 7” seems odd, but any chance to listen to new songs by bands you like should be welcomed. Temple of Baal have stayed pretty busy over the last decade, but prior to The Vision Of Fading Mankind, they’ve been pretty quiet since 2009. Ritualization is pretty new, with only two demos, but likewise have not released anything in three years. This is one of those odd splits, as both bands, while being of the black / death / black amalgam, sound so desperately opposite of each other, it is polarising to listen them back to back. Temple Of Baal start extremely strong with ‘Ordeals Of The Void’, a stoic, heavy ripper of ‘90s (the good kind) black metal, but falter with the bip-boppy upbeat ‘Slaves To The Beast’. Ritualization are much deathlier, much thrashier, but with a big, ol’ Tampa Death Metal™ growl. Ritualization are fast and furious and quite aurally opposed to what TOB are doing, but their side is equally time-worthy and quite the ripper of deathly metal.
JUSTIN STUBBS 4

 

TYRANT WRATH
TORTURE DEATHCULT
BATTLEGOD PRODUCTIONS
Swedish black metal which is pretty orthodox in outlook but isn’t above things like good production and catchy tunes, Torture Deathcult offers few surprises but a lot of good tunes. Opener ‘Hollow’ has a hint of Now, Diabolical-era Satyricon to it while ‘Death’s Lair’ has something of Immortal’s headbang-friendly swagger. That’s not to say that Tyrant Wrath don’t have an identity of their own; guitarist Kim C. has a way with clear, aggressive interlocking riffs while vocalist Adde H. has an authoritative rasp. Drumming on the album is by Sorcery’s Jocke Olofsson and is, at worst, rock-solid but is mostly pretty great. In fact, the whole is so good that I’m not sure why I’m not heralding the dawning of a major new BM band: nearly every track is dynamic, aggressive, and bristling with attitude (only ‘Hellfuck’ outstays its welcome), and several (notably the aforementioned ‘Death’s Lair’ and ‘I Above’) are really excellent. But it’s all a bit familiar, and it certainly won’t make doubters of the genre reconsider their opinions.
WILL PINFOLD 3

 

XEROSUN
ABSENCE OF LIGHT
RISING RECORDS
Dublin-based four-piece Xerosun have hit upon a hugely commercial sound on their Rising Records debut album. The pounding beats and driving guitar riffs are tempered by strong, melodic vocals; huge, obvious choruses; and rhythms you could dance to – if you felt so inclined. The undoubted commercial potential in their sound no doubt helped them to secure the support slot on the Irish leg of Avenged Sevenfold’s world tour, and they wouldn’t be out of place sharing a stage with the likes of Evanescence or Lacuna Coil, either. A lot of the melodies feel quite familiar on Absence Of Light, but I’m so far outside of my comfort zone here that I couldn’t fairly comment on the degree to which Xerosun are breaking new ground. All I can say is that these are the sort of songs I can easily imagine getting heavy rotation on the rock-based music TV channels. It’s accomplished if rather samey stuff, but rooted far too firmly in the current mainstream for my liking. I suspect a magazine like Kerrang! would add at least a point to the score below.
CHRIS KEE 2.5

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