ISSUE 62 | DEC/JAN, 2014
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Editorial Message

I guess you could say that Morbid Angel's Covenant was a bit 'past my time'. Not to take anything away from the record's magnitude 'n' influence, but allow me to explain. See, in 1993, when Covenant was released, I was an angry, know-it-all teenager - a perfect constitution for such an album, right? Not exactly. The shock & awe I experienced when I first heard Morbid Angel's Altars Of Madness had worn off by then, and I was (perhaps-unjustifiably) jaded with the death metal scene that Covenant was arriving in: most of the Earache bands had jumped ship to Columbia (or however that deal went), DM was getting gorier and more plentiful and also more predictable, and now here was this brazen bunch of once-gods scaling the summit to the very heights of commercialism and thumbing their noses at all the evil they've committed prior. In hindsight, nothing could be further from the truth.

The sheer act/fact of a band like Morbid Angel being on a major label seems almost revolutionary as we enter 2015, where listeners have developed near-ADD listening-habits, album sales have subsequently dwindled ever further, and the mainstream music world is starved for an artist to truly shake things up beyond leaked nude photos or ridiculous Twitter posts. Of course, the music really wasn't any different than what came before in the Morbid Angel canon: sheer class, sheer evil, and pushing the envelope just as hard as they did before. And much like Altars Of Madness irrevocably warped my preteen mind, so, too, would this highest-profile Covenant go on to alter the madness of many a few years younger than me - many of whom, in fact, are in bands you're currently listening to.

So, while we could semi-reasonably speculate that the band's current Covenant anniversary tour could be a cash-grab to make up for the none-more-divisive/nearly-career-killing Illud Divinum Insanus (I still contend that it would work well as two separate mini-albums), we should sit back and celebrate its important, impossible place in heavy metal history. Fitting for the occasion, we've got a no-holds-barred interview with ever-loquacious frontman Dave Vincent as our cover story, done by metal lifer Chris Kee. Oh, and this editorial note was written while listening to Technotronic. Really, no joke. PUMP UP THE JAM!

Nathan T. Birk, Editor
nathan@ztmag.com

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MAGAZINE CONTENTS

PROPAGANDA

News and ZT sponsored show details

COVER FEATURE

David Vincent | Morbid Angel

REGULAR FEATURES

Primordial | Mysticum | Manes | Today Is The Day | Absentia Lunae | Solefald | Fen | Thy Darkened Shade | Varathron | Pestilential Shadows | Soulburn | Bloodbath | The German Panzer

UNDERGROUND BLACK METAL SECTION

Mare Cognitum | Animus Mortis | Funereus

DARK ENTRIES | DARK AMBIENT

Lingua Fungi | Desiderii Marginis | Nyodene D

ANGER BURNING | RAW-PUNK - CRUST - D-BEAT

Vaaska | Frenzy | Nomad

RAPID FIRE

Skelethal | The Deathtrip | Lelahell | Sons Of Crom | Usnea | Manimalism | Stryvigor | Perdition Winds | Latitude Egress | Wolves Of Avalon | Doombringer | Temple Of Void

SENTENCING

Audio reviews including the ZT Soundcheck and Release Of The Issue Live reviews

INSIDE INFORMATION

  • LABEL PROFILE | Eolian Empire
  • DECORATED CAREERS | Order From Chaos
  • ON THE RACK | Old Man Gloom
  • THE DEFINITIVE HISTORY OF.... | Horror in metal. A special 8-page feature with Necrophagia's Killjoy and Autopsy's Chris Reifert
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