ISSUE 41 | JUN/JUL, 2011
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Editorial Message

By and large, extreme metallers are averse to change. How's that for stating the obvious? A sweeping generalisation, sure, but we all know it's pretty much true. Like many other subcultures — but, arguably, most intensely here — fans of extreme metal feel a sense of 'ownership' to their bands, a tacit understanding that they (and they alone) can dictate what Their Bands should and should not do on record. It all seems a bit silly, but this quasi-cultural dissonance has brought us some great art. Art that creates confusion. Art that causes dissent. Conflict. These are all healthy things, and few bands in the wider extreme-metal pantheon understand this always-gaping divide better than cover stars Ulver. They are a band in a constant state of flux, a metamorphosis-upon-metamorphosis, uncomfortable being pinned down to any particular genre, style, sound, etc — simply, they are Ulver. But are they metal anymore? For that matter, how long ago did they stop being metal? And if they did indeed stop 'being metal', why the bloody hell are they on the cover of ZT?! Not to give anything away, but you can find those answers (and plenty more) in our sprawling cover story.


The deeper symbolism of having Ulver on our cover at this juncture, however, is that they're emblematic of change, particularly the change that occurs as we get older — and, specifically, as we get older with the extreme metal we grew up with. Everyone knows Ulver started out as a black metal band. Fine. Everyone knows, too, that they ditched all that a few records down the line. Fine. But as they grew older and spread their sonic wings, so, too, did many extreme-metal fans. Would those fans' lives been perhaps a bit darker (dimmer?) if Ulver hadn't blossomed out of their black metalled cocoon? If it were not for Ulver, would many extreme metallers not have checked out Coil, Massive Attack, or Autechre if the former hadn't sonically name-checked them at some point during their ever-evolving/surprising career? Probably not. Which is all to say: extreme metal is great, and so is music outside extreme metal; change can be great, too, if you know your motives are true. Granted, this is an issue too complex for my allotted word count, but hopefully you'll find some food for thought across this entire issue, from the cover story all the way back to the final page. Get eating.

Nathan T. Birk, Deputy Editor
nathantbirk@www.ztmag.com

FREE 19-TRACK COVERMOUNT CD FEATURING

Ulver | Trillion Red | Obsidian Kingdom | Hate Eternal | The Senseless | Marduk | Der Weg Einer Freiheit | Wormrot | Subliritum | Harm | Spires | Morbid Angel | The Soulless | Coldwar | Damngod | SSS | Skeletal Damage | Sianyde | C.Saw

MAGAZINE CONTENTS

PROPAGANDA

News | Readers' letters | CD Tracklisting | ZT sponsored shows

COVER FEATURE

Ulver

REGULAR FEATURES

Morbid Angel | Anaal Nathrakh | Der Weg Einer Freiheit | Aosoth | Hell | Portrait vs. In Solitude | Pantheist | While Heaven Wept | Alcest | Tyr | Helheim | Autopsy | Demonical | Hammer Of Hate round-up | Satan's Host

UNDERGROUND BLACK METAL SECTION

Ravencult | Hrizg | Infestus | Mastiphal

POWER LINES SECTION | EXPERIMENTAL NOISE

Richard Ramirez | Cauldhame | Psychic TV

ANGER BURNING | CRUST / D-BEAT / RAWPUNK

Kriegshog | Inepsy | Lebanon

RAPID FIRE

Gifts In Secret | Tombs | Demons Gate | Maim | Dark Castle | Winterus | Blaspherian | Coldwar | Artizan | Vastum | Katana | Absolute Power | Argus | Finnr's Cane | Elitist | No Hand Path

SENTENCING

Audio reviews | Live reviews

INSIDE INFORMATION

  • Under The Influence | Alestorm's Christopher Bowes
  • Decorated Careers | Gardenian
  • Label Profile | Pest Productions
  • Artist Profile | Terrence Hannum
  • On The Rack| Erik Rutan
  • View From The Bunker | Alan Averill
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